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Headquarters

Chairman Kao-wen Mao

Chairman Kao-wen Mao graduated from National Taiwan University in 1960 with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, and earned his doctorate at Carengie-Mellon University in 1970. His extensive experience in the field of higher education includes serving as Dean of the College of Engineering at National Tsing Hua University, President of the National Taiwan Institute of Technology, and President of National Tsing Hua University. Chairman Mao also earned a reputation as an able administrator during his tenure as Minister of Education and Vice-President of the Examination Yuan. A skilled diplomat, he has also served his country as Ambassador to the Republic of Costa Rica.</>

President Yun-han Chu

Professor Yun-han Chu became President of the Foundation in June 2001, after having served as vice-president of the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation since April 1999. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1987, and in his distinguished research and teaching career since then has focused on the political economy of East Asian newly-industrialized countries (NIC's), democratization, and comparative mass political behavior. Before taking his post at the Foundation, Prof. Chu served for eleven years as Director of Programs at the Institute for National Policy Research in Taipei, and from 1994 until 1997 was Coordinator of the Political Science section of the National Science Council. He currently holds a joint appointment as Distinguished Research Fellow at the Institute of Political Science, Academia Sinica, and Professor of Political Science at National Taiwan University. His most recent academic honor was being elected to the 2012 list of Academicians during Academia Sinica’s biannual Convocation of Academicians, held on July 2-5, 2012.

Professor Chu is a three-time recipient of the National Science Council's Outstanding Research Award, the highest honor the Council bestows on individual professors. Publications to Prof. Chu's credit include more than one hundred journal articles and edited volume chapters, as well as twelve books and edited volumes, most recently Crafting Democracy in Taiwan (Taipei: Institute for National Policy Research, 1992) and the edited volumes Consolidating the Third Wave Democracies: Trends and Challenges (Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997), China Under Jiang Zemin (Boulder: Lynne Reinner Publishers, 2000), and How East Asians View Democracy (Columbia University Press, 2008). Prof. Chu is also a current editorial board member for several major research journals, including Journal of Democracy, International Studies Quarterly, Pacific Affairs, Journal of East Asian Studies, Journal of Contemporary China, and China Perspective. He was the President of the Chinese Association of Political Science (2003-2005) and a member of the Council of American Political Science Association (2009-2011). In October 2014, he received the University of Minnesota's Outstanding Achievement Award, which is the highest honor bestowed upon its graduates.

Vice-President Chun-i Chen

On September 1, 2013, Professor Chun-i Chen assumed the position of Foundation Vice-President. He was born in 1964, and earned his B.A. at Tung-hai University and his S.J.D. from Tulane University. He is currently Professor of Law and Diplomacy at National Chengchi University (Taiwan), and former President of the Chinese (Taiwan) Society of International Law, Co-Chair of the Law in the Pacific Rim Region Interest Group of the American Society of International Law and the Associate Editor and Executive Editor of the Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs.

Vice-President Chen is a world-recognized expert in international law. He has also authored and edited a number of important scholarly volumes, including The Status of Customary International Law, Treaties, Agreements and Semi-official or Unofficial Agreements in Law of the Republic of China on Taiwan (co-authored with Professor Hung-Dah Chiu), as well as numerous scholarly articles in both Chinese and English. He also prepared a revised and expanded edition of Professor Hung-Dah Chiu’s magnum opus, entitled Modern International Law.

Program Director Paul R. Katz

Paul R. Katz, Distinguished Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, obtained his doctorate from the Department of East Asian Studies, Princeton University. A specialist in the history of Chinese religion and society, his most recent books include: When Valleys Turned Blood Red: The Ta-pa-ni Incident in Colonial Taiwan; Divine Justice -- Religion and the Development of Chinese Legal Culture; and Religion in China and its Modern Fate.